Afro American News

The day after.

I would like to start this post by telling the nominee for president of a major political party in this country that "Afghan" is not a country. Also, I doubt seriously that the president is some kind of secret Muslim who is trying to undermine everything America stands for. “Look, we’re led by a man that either is not tough, not smart, or he’s got something else in mind,” the presumptive Republican presidential nominee declared. “And the something else in mind—you know, people can't believe it. People cannot, they cannot believe that President Obama is acting the way he acts and can’t even mention the words ‘radical Islamic terrorism.’ There’s something going on. It’s inconceivable. There’s something going on.”So anyway, it's the day after the mass murder of club goers in Orlando, and, as is to be expected, the usual suspects are playing politic games with the tragedy. Donald trump has been all over the news and he has been telling everyone who will listen that he has the magic bullet to stop terrorism and keep those evil Muslims in check. But does he? From all accounts Isis and similar groups have been using trump's cartoonish mug for recruiting purposes and using his words to fire up young Jihadist fighters. It's scary to think what type of fight against terror a president trump will coordinate. He already has some loopy plans that are not grounded in reality. "Without distinguishing between mainstream Muslims and Islamist terrorists, Mr. Trump suggested that all Muslim immigrants posed potential threats to America’s security and called for a ban on migrants from any part of the world with “a proven history of terrorism” against the United States or its allies. He also insinuated that American Muslims were all but complicit in acts of domestic terrorism for failing to report attacks in advance, asserting without evidence that they had warnings of shootings like the one in Orlando. Mr. Trump’s speech, delivered at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., represented an extraordinary break from the longstanding rhetorical norms of American presidential nominees. But if his language more closely resembled a European nationalist’s than a mainstream Republican’s, he was wagering that voters are stirred more by their fears of Islamic terrorism than any concerns they may have about his flouting traditions of tolerance and respect for religious diversity." [Source] Fear is a powerful thing, and it can lead good people to make bad choices. Mr. trump is counting on it. *Pic from miamiherald.com<!-- AddThis Feed Button BEGIN --> <!-- AddThis Feed Button END -->

Image result for orlando shooter images I would like to start this post by telling the nominee for president of a major political party in this country that “Afghan” is not a country. Also, I doubt seriously that the president is some kind of secret Muslim who is trying to undermine everything America stands for.

“Look, we’re led by a man that either is not tough, not smart, or he’s got something else in mind,” the presumptive Republican presidential nominee declared. “And the something else in mind—you know, people can’t believe it. People cannot, they cannot believe that President Obama is acting the way he acts and can’t even mention the words ‘radical Islamic terrorism.’ There’s something going on. It’s inconceivable. There’s something going on.”

So anyway, it’s the day after the mass murder of club goers in Orlando, and, as is to be expected, the usual suspects are playing politic games with the tragedy.

Donald trump has been all over the news and he has been telling everyone who will listen that he has the magic bullet to stop terrorism and keep those evil Muslims in check. But does he? From all accounts Isis and similar groups have been using trump’s cartoonish mug for recruiting purposes and using his words to fire up young Jihadist fighters.

It’s scary to think what type of fight against terror a president trump will coordinate. He already has some loopy plans that are not grounded in reality.

“Without distinguishing between mainstream Muslims and Islamist terrorists, Mr. Trump suggested that all Muslim immigrants posed potential threats to America’s security and called for a ban on migrants from any part of the world with “a proven history of terrorism” against the United States or its allies. He also insinuated that American Muslims were all but complicit in acts of domestic terrorism for failing to report attacks in advance, asserting without evidence that they had warnings of shootings like the one in Orlando.
Mr. Trump’s speech, delivered at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., represented an extraordinary break from the longstanding rhetorical norms of American presidential nominees. But if his language more closely resembled a European nationalist’s than a mainstream Republican’s, he was wagering that voters are stirred more by their fears of Islamic terrorism than any concerns they may have about his flouting traditions of tolerance and respect for religious diversity.” [Source]

Fear is a powerful thing, and it can lead good people to make bad choices. Mr. trump is counting on it.

*Pic from miamiherald.com

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The day after.

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