Police In San Diego Kill Mentally Ill Black Man Alfred Olango

[Image: Facebook]“Why couldn’t you tase him? I told you he is sick. And you guys shot him!” Alfred Olango‘s sister can be heard telling officers in a video. “I called police to help him, not to kill him.” Olango’s sister had called police Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, because she said he was acting strangely and not himself, while they were outside the Broadway Village shopping center in El Cajon, a suburb of San Diego, CA. Eyewitnesses report that Olango was having a seizure or another sort of mental-health or medical emergency, reports The Root. “I called three times for them to come help me,” Olango’s sister cried on a Facebook Live Stream. “Nobody came; they said it’s not priority.” When the police finally arrived, an officer fatally shot Olango. He died at an area hospital. The police say Olango “was acting erratically and failed to comply, although they did not release details on the specific threat he presented to officers,” reports NBC7. However, eyewitnesses say the police were unduly quick to open fire on the 30-year-old man and their actions were racially motivated, Al Jazeera reports. <!--nextpage--> The El Cajon Police Department released a still image taken from a mobile phone video of the moment in efforts to “prove” Olango was a threat. [Image: El Cajon Police Department] An eyewitness on the scene said, “The Black male was up with his hands up like this, scared to death, not knowing which way he was gonna go. And that’s the honest truth.” El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis confirmed that Olango was not armed. The police department told reporters that it was aware officers were responding to a “5150” call when Olango was fatally shot. The Root reports the definition of a “5150” call as: “When a person, as a result of a mental disorder, is a danger to himself/herself or others or is gravely disabled, a peace officer, a member of the attending staff, or another professional person designated by the county may with probable cause take the person into custody and place him or her in a facility for a 72-hour treatment and evaluation.” Police didn’t bring in the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team to assist with the call. Judging from PERT’s responsibilities, which are in part below, they could’ve deescalated the situation by assessing Olango’s mental state on the scene. “Provides emergency assessment and referral for individuals with mental illness who come to the attention of law enforcement through phone calls from community members or in-field law enforcement request for emergency assistance. PERT pairs licensed mental health clinicians with uniformed law enforcement officers/deputies. Clinicians work out of individual law enforcement divisions and respond in the field with their law enforcement partners.” The officer who shot Olango hasn’t been identified. The shooting sparked protests at the scene for several hours and outside the police department. Demonstrators allege police racism spurred the shooting of Olango. RELATED: El Cajon Officer Richard Gonsalves Shot And Killed Alfred Olango Source/Source/Source

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[Image: Facebook]

“Why couldn’t you tase him? I told you he is sick. And you guys shot him!” Alfred Olango‘s sister can be heard telling officers in a video. “I called police to help him, not to kill him.”

Olango’s sister had called police Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, because she said he was acting strangely and not himself, while they were outside the Broadway Village shopping center in El Cajon, a suburb of San Diego, CA. Eyewitnesses report that Olango was having a seizure or another sort of mental-health or medical emergency, reports The Root.

“I called three times for them to come help me,” Olango’s sister cried on a Facebook Live Stream. “Nobody came; they said it’s not priority.”

When the police finally arrived, an officer fatally shot Olango. He died at an area hospital.

The police say Olango “was acting erratically and failed to comply, although they did not release details on the specific threat he presented to officers,” reports NBC7.

However, eyewitnesses say the police were unduly quick to open fire on the 30-year-old man and their actions were racially motivated, Al Jazeera reports.

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